Posts Tagged ‘iPhone apps’

Missy Krasner, EIR at Morgenthaler Ventures, leads a discussion with Ian Shakil cofounder of Augmedix and Dr. Pierre Theodore, surgeon and thoracic oncologist at UCSF about ways wearable technology Google Glass could be used in healthcare, in clinical, surgical, and consumer settings.

Rock Health’s Health Innovation Summit brings together the brightest minds across industries to wrestle with healthcare’s most challenging problems. This 2-day conference features leaders and up-and-comers in digital health in unique and participatory programming. To learn more about Health Innovation Summit, visit http://www.healthinnovationsummit.com.

Rock Health funds and supports startups building the next generation of technologies transforming healthcare. To learn more about Rock Health, visit http://www.rockhealth.com.

 

Source youtube, Rockhealth

Advertisements

Application developers are racing to have their software ready to go when Google Glass, the wearable computer with an optical head-mounted display, finally becomes available to the general public by year-end.

But while most apps will focus on the infotainment space, analysts predict there will be a huge secondary opportunity for app development in healthcare and physical-activity monitoring.

Indeed, Shane Walker, associate director for Consumer and Digital Health Research at IHS, believes blood glucose meters, cholesterol meters and pill dispensers are just a few of the dedicated medical devices that could potentially tie into Glass via Bluetooth connections.

Image at the top of the page is Google Co-Founder Sergey Brin demo’ing Google Glass (Photo Credit: Paul Sakuma/AP)

“You might have the app set up for automatic reminders to the Glass wearer with recurring data points throughout the day,” he said, “or Glass could provide warnings through the eyepiece that there might potentially be a problem of which the wearer needs to be aware.”

In a recent online presentation hosted by Kaiser Permanente’s Center for Total Health, app developer Silica Labs demo’d Glass, indicating that one of the company’s objectives is to develop healthcare apps for the device.

But right now, said Antonio Zugaldia, Silica Labs’ chief builder, the Google API isn’t optimized for real-time streaming, so connecting to peripheral devices — such as activity monitors — would require a workaround.

However, said Walker of IHS, the Glass software is updated on a monthly basis, and Google did add video streaming in a recent update to the Mirror API. Meanwhile, developing native applications can be done using the Android Software Development Kit (SDK), even though this is something of a workaround until the full Glass Development Kit (GDK) arrives for native applications.

For the time being, however, a handful of app developers are proceeding with their healthcare-related creations:

CPRGlass. An app that will guide users step by step on how best to perform CPR. It will contact 911, inform users regarding adequate compressions (by playing the disco hit “Stayin’ Alive,” whose beat guides the user to compress at a rate of 100/min.), let users know if there is an automated defibrillator nearby (information which comes from AED4.US’s crowd-sourced database), and perhaps contact someone nearby the AED to ask them to bring it to the user if possible. At the moment, CPRGlass is in the prototype stage, but its developer, Dr. Christian Assad-Kottner, interventional cardiology fellow at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, hopes to release a beta version soon to selected Glass testers.

CATHGlass. Also on the drawing board of Dr. Assad-Kottner, this app for cardiologists will provide important patient information during procedures.

Cerora’s MindReader. BrickSimple, a developer of mobile apps, has demonstrated wireless Google Glass integration with Cerora’s MindReader over Bluetooth. The MindReader technology is designed to help medical personnel identify head injuries in both battlefield and sports scenarios.

“When you’re dealing with head injuries,” said Det Ansinn, BrickSimple’s president, “time spent glancing away at equipment is time not spent on studying the patient for important visual cues. The integration of Google Glass with MindReader will improve the physician/patient experience and potential for better diagnosis.”

And at mobile app developer Somo, senior innovation manager Joel Blackmore reports the company recently held a companywide “Hack Day” to encourage staff to come up with ideas for development. Of the seven proofs of concept that emerged, two medical-specific POCs are being turned into fully formed products to showcase to clients as part of Somo’s Innovation Lab:

For diagnosing patients. The app will allow a doctor to use Glass to diagnose symptoms more accurately. Speaking into Glass, the doctor might say: “Patient has the following symptoms – itchy skin, fatigue, dry patches, and insomnia.” Glass might respond with two possible diagnoses – food allergy or mercury toxicity.
For the operating room. The app could help a doctor compare a patient’s anatomy to a normal or healthy standard. The doctor might say: “Glass, show me what a normal liver looks like.” Glass would respond with an appropriate image.

Because users hear Glass not through typical headphones or earbuds but through a bone-conduction transducer, Walker of IHS believes — and a professional audiologist concurs — that there will be an opportunity for Glass to be used for hearing augmentation.

“If you have one-sided deafness, you could potentially use the bone conduction transducer as a hearing aid,” Walker explains. Companies like TransEar currently employ that technology, he says, but their device is constructed to fit into the ear canal. Fairly common, too, are implanted bone conductors for severe hearing loss.

“Using Glass for this purpose wouldn’t require an implant, which involves a surgical procedure and is very expensive,” he says. “For some people this would be an inexpensive alternative. I can even imagine using speech-to-text technology so that the written words would display on the Glass eyepiece, making the app even more powerful.”

With a little imagination, says Dr. Assad-Kottner, one can conceptualize all sorts of possible medical uses for Glass. For instance, he says:

Help With Procedures. Imagine this: A resident says, “OK, Glass, call Dr. Smith.” Dr. Smith responds (via Glass) and the resident explains that he is stuck and not sure how to proceed with a patient. Dr. Smith may recommend a different approach since he is able to see what the resident sees – or he can instruct the resident to stop the procedure altogether.
Electronic Medical Records [EMRs]. Teams like Evermed are working on an app to use Glass with EMRs. A patient would come into the doctor’s office, Glass would identify the patient using facial recognition and then pull up the most recent medical information for the doctor to view instantly, such as allergies, previous plan, if goal was achieved, scheduled procedures, results from last ordered tests, and so on. (In a challenge to the marketability of this app, Google recently announced that it is banning facial-recognition applications for the near-term until privacy concerns are addressed.)
Telemedicine. Dr. Assad-Kottner has experimented with a colleague to do the first cardiology consult over Glass. “The way it felt,” he says, “was practically like being next to the patient.”

Jack Kent, IHS principal analyst, mobile, said he definitely agrees that medical applications, as well as industrial use cases where hands-free access to information is useful, “will be a real opportunity for Google Glass.

“For the past few years, smartphones and tablets have dominated developer activity with new apps and experiences tailored to the specific demands of those devices,” he said. “Google Glass is one of a number of new devices that will hope to attract the developer expertise. It is important to remember that these will usually be tied to a smartphone to provide core functionality and connectivity. But the overall app experience will be very different.”

Source : electronic360

Apple Can Launch the CDMA Version of iPhone in India Soon.

 

 

Posted by sunshine on October 12th, 2010

From last couple of days we are hearing about Apple new version of iPhone CDMA which can be launched with in U.S. via Verizon network early next year. Surprisingly Apple seems to carry many other plans for its CDMA version of iPhone in its kitty.  Parallel to Verizon, Apple is also holding talks with 2 major Indian telecom operators to dig the possibility of iPhone CDMA launch in India. Tata Teleservices and Reliance Communications, two of the leading telecom operators and pioneer in CDMA service, are holding close talks with Apple Inc for possible launch of iPhone CDMA launch in sometime early next year, as reported by WSJ.

Few of the Telecom industry analyst credits the Apple for such major move as Indian is one of the biggest potential market for the new version of iPhone. By all the means, it will benefit both parties if such moves comes into existence.

Why is Apple Desperate:

Currently Apple is marking its presence in Indian market by iPhone 3G & 3GS which available via Vodafone and Bharti Telecom. Despite of creating huge excitement among Indian consumers, Apple failed to capture the significant market share due to high price tag and service availability. Like U.S and Europe market, few of the iPhone’s major features needs 3G network to execute those services. Unfortunately, 3G services were not available at the time of iPhone launch in India and are still few months far from the expected launch date.

People in India failed to find the correct justification for such expensive mobile which is half dead from the beginning. Being as fastest growing mobile market, India has become an important country for almost all mobile manufacturers’ sales plan.

If Apple manages to stamp the success in CDMA market, which is adding 18 million users monthly, company will see further growth in client base as iPhone users including its GSM services. The country currently has about 135 million CDMA users and if both the operators will manage to replicate the ram of iPhone in U.S., it will surely help them battle shrinking revenues and margins due to intense competition. Currently, the cheapest iPhone in India costs more than $670 and is considered very expensive for a country where 42% of the population earns less than $1.25 a day.

At the same time, Apple is also facing intense market & internal pressure due to tough and constant growing adoption of Google’s Android platform. Most of the enterprise level smartphones which have been recently launched india ( and also similar price range of iPhone) are gaining popularity but running on Android platform. As per the industry experts in India, people are going through the transition phase where they 10% – 18% business mobile phone users will upgrade themselves to touch screen smartphones. The numbers are so impressive that Apple can’t afford to miss such prominent opportunity.

Indian Mobile Market Scenario

However, analysts feel Apple may find it tough to generate significant revenue from a CDMA-based iPhone in India given that it is not as widely used as a GSM phone, and because there is stiff competition for smartphones from companies including Nokia Corp., Motorola Inc.,HTC Corp., Samsung Electronics Co. and Research in Motion Inc.

Moreover, as per few recent reports Google is pushing to become a significant player of Indian mobile industry through little-known Indian handset makers that are poised to launch low-cost devices that include the tech giant’s Android operating system in coming months.

Compare to Nokia, who shipped 1.8 million mobile phones

and captured 71% of market share in first half of 2010, Apple accounted less than 1% of market share in the same duration. On the other hand India mobile market is expected to grow by 38 million by 2014 and shows a promising growth for all mobile manufacturers and operators.

By paying attention to such reports and analysis, Vendors in India are ready to experiment with various new handsets and Technology which can help them to establish their presence in world’s fastest growing mobile market. However, It would be interesting to see

The US first conference focusing solely on mobile learning is being held April 6, 7, and 8 in Phoenix, Arizona. Check out the website and see all the great presenters.

* Mobile Learning Experience 2011 website and registration is now online! http://mobile2011.org – Please spread the word! #mobile2011

Mobile learning can happen anywhere: in a classroom, at the dinning room table, on a bus, in front of a science exhibit, at the zoo…anywhere! Portability is not as important as the ability of the learner to connect, communicate, collaborate, and create using tools that are readily at hand. Here are some examples:

* A learner may take notes on her phone and later transfers them to a laptop where she adds images and shares the document online with her study group.

* A student who does not understand a math concept finds a podcast to view that visually explains the concept.

* During class a group of students create flashcards that they can access from their handheld computers at home.

* Students film video using their cell phones and transfer it to a computer for editing. The video is saved to a website for classmates to learn from.

* While reading historical fiction, a student wants to know more about President Nixon, so he instantly accesses the article about Watergate online and views the Watergate complex on an interactive map.