Posts Tagged ‘America’

How_Old_Is_Too_Young_Full_Infographic

When it comes to kids under the age of seven?

  • 41% of parents allow them to use a gaming console unsupervised.
  • 40% allow unsupervised access to a computer.
  • 29% of parents allow their kids under age 7 to use a mobile apps unsupervised.

The poll also asked about teaching online safety to kids. Eighty-nine percent of people without kids and 74% of parentsagree that parents should provide online safety guidance.”

Thanks to the the survey uncovered by Microsoft that computers and gaming consoles are introduced at 8 on average, whereas email, texting, and social networking are allowed later on (between ages 11 and 12). By the teen years (13), parents surveyed allow kids to use devices and online services without supervision. (Parents who did not allow usage of mobile devices and online services when they took the survey planned to do so later, when their kids are 15 to 18 years old.)

Are you flipping kidding me? If an eight-year-old child is online, unsupervised, without safety guidance, then that seems like a recipe for disaster. And kids installing mobile apps without supervision…does that mean they know all about checking out the permissions that apps ask for and what is and is not acceptable?

When the father of the 14-year-old girl was asked about his daughter’s malicious harassing and cyberbullying, he told The Associated Press, “None of it’s true. My daughter’s a good girl and I’m 100% sure that whatever they’re saying about my daughter is not true.”
 
Oh really? Maybe the dad should check out his daughter’s bragging on Facebook. “‘Yes, I bullied Rebecca and she killed herself but I don’t give a …’ and you can add the last word yourself,” quoted the sheriff from the girl’s Facebook post.
 
Does unsupervised device and social network usage, with or without online safety guidance, still seem wise? People without kids responded an average of two to three years later as acceptable for allowing device usage, meaning parents are less strict and “may be cooler than kids think.”
 
 
Take the Survey here: https://survey2.securestudies.com/wix/p222707061.aspx

Source: http://www.microsoft.com/security/resources/conversations.aspx

Entire Survey Report download here (PPT) : How_Old_Is_Too_Young_2013_Research_Results

 
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Senate for fourth time rejects House anti-Obamacare provisions

A stalemate in Congress that caused a government shutdown on Tuesday continued with Senate Democrats voting for a fourth time to reject a spending plan by House Republicans that sought to undermine Obamacare. FULL STORY | LIVE BLOG | 7 things you won’t have to worry about | What’s open, what’s closed | What happens next? | Boehner blames Senate  Video | Tea party reaction  Video | Congress sinks to all-time low in CNN polling

 

Source CNN – By Holly Yan and Tom Cohen, CNN

Missy Krasner, EIR at Morgenthaler Ventures, leads a discussion with Ian Shakil cofounder of Augmedix and Dr. Pierre Theodore, surgeon and thoracic oncologist at UCSF about ways wearable technology Google Glass could be used in healthcare, in clinical, surgical, and consumer settings.

Rock Health’s Health Innovation Summit brings together the brightest minds across industries to wrestle with healthcare’s most challenging problems. This 2-day conference features leaders and up-and-comers in digital health in unique and participatory programming. To learn more about Health Innovation Summit, visit http://www.healthinnovationsummit.com.

Rock Health funds and supports startups building the next generation of technologies transforming healthcare. To learn more about Rock Health, visit http://www.rockhealth.com.

 

Source youtube, Rockhealth

Application developers are racing to have their software ready to go when Google Glass, the wearable computer with an optical head-mounted display, finally becomes available to the general public by year-end.

But while most apps will focus on the infotainment space, analysts predict there will be a huge secondary opportunity for app development in healthcare and physical-activity monitoring.

Indeed, Shane Walker, associate director for Consumer and Digital Health Research at IHS, believes blood glucose meters, cholesterol meters and pill dispensers are just a few of the dedicated medical devices that could potentially tie into Glass via Bluetooth connections.

Image at the top of the page is Google Co-Founder Sergey Brin demo’ing Google Glass (Photo Credit: Paul Sakuma/AP)

“You might have the app set up for automatic reminders to the Glass wearer with recurring data points throughout the day,” he said, “or Glass could provide warnings through the eyepiece that there might potentially be a problem of which the wearer needs to be aware.”

In a recent online presentation hosted by Kaiser Permanente’s Center for Total Health, app developer Silica Labs demo’d Glass, indicating that one of the company’s objectives is to develop healthcare apps for the device.

But right now, said Antonio Zugaldia, Silica Labs’ chief builder, the Google API isn’t optimized for real-time streaming, so connecting to peripheral devices — such as activity monitors — would require a workaround.

However, said Walker of IHS, the Glass software is updated on a monthly basis, and Google did add video streaming in a recent update to the Mirror API. Meanwhile, developing native applications can be done using the Android Software Development Kit (SDK), even though this is something of a workaround until the full Glass Development Kit (GDK) arrives for native applications.

For the time being, however, a handful of app developers are proceeding with their healthcare-related creations:

CPRGlass. An app that will guide users step by step on how best to perform CPR. It will contact 911, inform users regarding adequate compressions (by playing the disco hit “Stayin’ Alive,” whose beat guides the user to compress at a rate of 100/min.), let users know if there is an automated defibrillator nearby (information which comes from AED4.US’s crowd-sourced database), and perhaps contact someone nearby the AED to ask them to bring it to the user if possible. At the moment, CPRGlass is in the prototype stage, but its developer, Dr. Christian Assad-Kottner, interventional cardiology fellow at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, hopes to release a beta version soon to selected Glass testers.

CATHGlass. Also on the drawing board of Dr. Assad-Kottner, this app for cardiologists will provide important patient information during procedures.

Cerora’s MindReader. BrickSimple, a developer of mobile apps, has demonstrated wireless Google Glass integration with Cerora’s MindReader over Bluetooth. The MindReader technology is designed to help medical personnel identify head injuries in both battlefield and sports scenarios.

“When you’re dealing with head injuries,” said Det Ansinn, BrickSimple’s president, “time spent glancing away at equipment is time not spent on studying the patient for important visual cues. The integration of Google Glass with MindReader will improve the physician/patient experience and potential for better diagnosis.”

And at mobile app developer Somo, senior innovation manager Joel Blackmore reports the company recently held a companywide “Hack Day” to encourage staff to come up with ideas for development. Of the seven proofs of concept that emerged, two medical-specific POCs are being turned into fully formed products to showcase to clients as part of Somo’s Innovation Lab:

For diagnosing patients. The app will allow a doctor to use Glass to diagnose symptoms more accurately. Speaking into Glass, the doctor might say: “Patient has the following symptoms – itchy skin, fatigue, dry patches, and insomnia.” Glass might respond with two possible diagnoses – food allergy or mercury toxicity.
For the operating room. The app could help a doctor compare a patient’s anatomy to a normal or healthy standard. The doctor might say: “Glass, show me what a normal liver looks like.” Glass would respond with an appropriate image.

Because users hear Glass not through typical headphones or earbuds but through a bone-conduction transducer, Walker of IHS believes — and a professional audiologist concurs — that there will be an opportunity for Glass to be used for hearing augmentation.

“If you have one-sided deafness, you could potentially use the bone conduction transducer as a hearing aid,” Walker explains. Companies like TransEar currently employ that technology, he says, but their device is constructed to fit into the ear canal. Fairly common, too, are implanted bone conductors for severe hearing loss.

“Using Glass for this purpose wouldn’t require an implant, which involves a surgical procedure and is very expensive,” he says. “For some people this would be an inexpensive alternative. I can even imagine using speech-to-text technology so that the written words would display on the Glass eyepiece, making the app even more powerful.”

With a little imagination, says Dr. Assad-Kottner, one can conceptualize all sorts of possible medical uses for Glass. For instance, he says:

Help With Procedures. Imagine this: A resident says, “OK, Glass, call Dr. Smith.” Dr. Smith responds (via Glass) and the resident explains that he is stuck and not sure how to proceed with a patient. Dr. Smith may recommend a different approach since he is able to see what the resident sees – or he can instruct the resident to stop the procedure altogether.
Electronic Medical Records [EMRs]. Teams like Evermed are working on an app to use Glass with EMRs. A patient would come into the doctor’s office, Glass would identify the patient using facial recognition and then pull up the most recent medical information for the doctor to view instantly, such as allergies, previous plan, if goal was achieved, scheduled procedures, results from last ordered tests, and so on. (In a challenge to the marketability of this app, Google recently announced that it is banning facial-recognition applications for the near-term until privacy concerns are addressed.)
Telemedicine. Dr. Assad-Kottner has experimented with a colleague to do the first cardiology consult over Glass. “The way it felt,” he says, “was practically like being next to the patient.”

Jack Kent, IHS principal analyst, mobile, said he definitely agrees that medical applications, as well as industrial use cases where hands-free access to information is useful, “will be a real opportunity for Google Glass.

“For the past few years, smartphones and tablets have dominated developer activity with new apps and experiences tailored to the specific demands of those devices,” he said. “Google Glass is one of a number of new devices that will hope to attract the developer expertise. It is important to remember that these will usually be tied to a smartphone to provide core functionality and connectivity. But the overall app experience will be very different.”

Source : electronic360

Chalk it up to a learning experience: too much debt, even in a low interest rate environment, can be costly.

Cengage Learning, a private equity-backed education company, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Tuesday as part of an effort to shrink its $5.8 billion debt load. The company, based in Stamford, Conn., also said that it had entered into a restructuring agreement with lenders who hold $2 billion of its first-lien debt. The restructuring will eliminate more than $4 billion in debt from the company’s balance sheet.

“The decisive actions we are taking today will reduce our debt and improve our capital structure to support our long-term business strategy of transitioning from traditional print models to digital educational and research materials,” Michael Hansen, Cengage Learning’s chief executive, said in a statement.

Cengage was originally Thomson Learning, part of the Thomson media conglomerate of Canada, which sold it for about $7.75 billion in 2007 when the company was preparing to merge with Reuters. The buyers were Apax Partners and Omers Capital Partners — a private equity unit of the Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement Board pension fund.

As Cengage, the company acquired the college publishing division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing for $750 million. In 2011, Cengage acquired National Geographic’s digital and print school publishing unit for an undisclosed price.

Cengage said that it planned to make timely payment to vendors for goods and services during its Chapter 11 restructuring and that employees would continue to receive their usual pay and health and welfare benefits. In the filing in the United States bankruptcy court in Brooklyn, the company said it had more than $1 billion in assets.

Cengage’s legal adviser is Kirkland & Ellis, its restructuring adviser is Alvarez & Marsal, and its financial adviser is Lazard.

Source : By DEALBOOK

Interview with Russ Rudish

Feeling the squeeze from regulatory and economic fronts, health care providers are looking to health information technologies to improve operational efficiency and patient care, according to Russ Rudish, vice chairman and principal, Deloitte LLP, and leader of the U.S. and Global Health Care practices. Read on for his perspective on the year ahead.

Deloitte | 2013 outlook on health care providers | Interview with Russ Rudish

Russ Rudish

 

What is the key issue facing the health care provider sector in 2013?

Health care providers, for numerous regulatory and environmental reasons, have been and will likely continue feeling increased margin pressure. The recent Supreme Court decision related to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) clarified the path and pace of federal health care reform efforts. The ACA, among other legislative reforms addressing health care, will likely result in additional taxes, costs and penalties for providers; these could be exacerbated by federal budget cuts unless Congress and the president agree on an alternative to the sequester, a deficit-reduction mechanism written into last year’s Budget Control Act

Health care providers in 2013 are likely to experience a four-prong revenue hit: Under ACA, payment rates may decrease for Medicare and Medicaid populations and providers could be penalized for avoidable readmissions; lingering unemployment may lead to more uninsured patients; increased consumerism is making people more conscious of their health care spending; and fewer individuals are projected to sign up for individual insurance than originally anticipated. All of these factors are putting provider margins at risk. In response, we see health care providers looking at ways to reduce costs and enhance revenue, as they continue to deal with the challenges of operating in a time of transition from fee for service to outcome based reimbursement.

What are some steps companies can take to manage through the current climate of economic uncertainty?

“Organizations that have overhauled operations and implemented effective administrative and clinical information technology (IT) systems can be better positioned should Congress increase fraud detection as a result of their inability to secure appropriation funds.”

Health care providers could begin actively formulating potential scenarios and responses for a market defined by continued economic uncertainty. As cost pressures continue to rise due to penalties for unnecessary care and increasing pressures from physicians to “employ” them, it is important that organizations assess their sustainability and access to capital. Determining how to do more with less is an important consideration and one that should include an evaluation of consolidation scenarios. We continue to see consolidation accelerating in certain regions as large health systems buy additional facilities and/or smaller practices to improve efficiency, spread overhead and reduce operating costs.

Providers could also continue to make more efficient and significant use of technology – both in their facilities and for patient self-care at home. Organizations that have overhauled operations and implemented effective administrative and clinical information technology (IT) systems can be better positioned should Congress increase fraud detection as a result of their inability to secure appropriation funds.

Also, providers might begin initiating tactics to create stronger consumer relationships (e.g., mobile apps, social media, etc.) and closer links among individual physicians, hospitals and insurance companies so that, by working together, they can insure and care for patients in a more fluid and efficient manner.

What are high-performing companies doing to foster innovation and growth?

Health care providers are seeking to establish and maintain a competitive advantage in the uncertain, post-ACA environment of 2013 and beyond. They are investing in new programs and health information technologies that can enable them to forge stronger relationships with consumers, create greater operational efficiencies, lower costs and improve quality.

In addition, health care providers are increasingly collaborating with nontraditional partners – such as health plans and pharmaceutical companies – to identify and pursue novel ways to treat disease, facilitate efficient research and development (R&D) and promote wellness beyond what has been done to date. To support these efforts, providers, health plans and pharma companies are embracing the use of rich data and analytics to drive clinical and operational innovation.

Source Deloitte | 2013 outlook on health care providers | Interview with Russ Rudish.